May 05, 2016

How to Bind a Quilt by Machine - A Tutorial

When it came time to bind my Denim Hexies mini quilt, I took pictures of the whole process so I could write a tutorial for how I bind my quilts. This is kind of a mash-up of all the different binding tricks I've picked up over the years and I hope you'll find something useful in my method.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
I'll warn you now, this is a long, picture-heavy post! Let's go!


Calculate How Much Binding

The first step is figuring out how much binding you need. Here's my formula for calculating how many strips I need to cut:

(Quilt length + Quilt width) x 2 + 20" = the total number of inches you need.

That extra 20" is for mitering the corners and joining the two ends of the binding. Some people only add 10", but I like to be sure I'll have more than enough and I won't be struggling to get those ends joined.

My mini quilt measures 11.5" long and 22" wide, so my formula looks like this:

(11.5 + 22) x 2 + 20" = 87"

Assuming 40" of usable fabric in each strip, take your total number of inches needed and divide it by 40, then round up to get the number of strips you need to cut.
87 ÷ 40 = 2.175

I will confess that because I only needed .175 of a third strip, I did go with only using two strips and it worked fine, so use your own judgement if your number comes out to be just barely above a whole number.

Make the Binding

How wide you cut your strips is, in part, a matter of personal preference. 2 1/2" seems to be the most common measurement, but I prefer to cut mine at 2 1/4" as I find it makes for a neater finish. The best way to figure out what you prefer is to bind a couple of quilts with each measurement and choose which one works best for you. There is no right or wrong answer on this one.

Once you've cut as many strips as you need, it's time to join them together. We'll join them with a diagonal seam to reduce the bulk.

Place the end of one strip on the table, right side up. Place one end of a second strip on top, right sides together and perpendicular to the first strip. Check to be sure this is actually a separate strip and you're not joining the two ends of one strip together (yes, I have done this!). I like to leave a smidge of fabric visible at the ends so I can see the intersections better. It helps me sew a straighter line :) Pin the strips together.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Stitch a diagonal line from the intersection at the top left to the intersection at the bottom right. You can mark this line before stitching if you want, but it's such a short seam that I find marking isn't necessary.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
 Trim off the corner, leaving a 1/4" seam allowance.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Continue adding strips until you have one long piece. Press the seam allowances, open or to one side - your choice. The places where your strips are joined will look like this:
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Press the binding in half along the entire width, wrong sides together.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
You now have one long strip of binding ready to attach to your quilt! I'm only binding a mini quilt, so my strip isn't actually all that long, but if you're binding a bed-sized quilt, your binding will be much more impressive looking! At this point, depending on when you'll actually attach it to your quilt, or your social media needs, you could roll the binding into a pretty circle, or you can do as I usually do and leave it like this.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com

Attach the Binding to the Quilt Back

Before you can attach the binding to your quilt, you need to trim off the excess batting and backing.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
It looks more like a finished quilt already!
If you want to add triangles in the corners for hanging your quilt, now is the time to do that. I recommend this tutorial. As you can see, I also add my label before adding the binding.

It's a good idea to check placement before you actually stitch the binding on, to be sure none of your seams are going to end up on a corner. That makes the corner bulky and not at all neat (ask me how I know...). To avoid that, lay your quilt down on the table or floor, with the back facing up. Starting part way along one side, lay out the binding, keeping it right at the edge of the quilt and adding a little extra at the corners to simulate the miter. If a seam ends up on a corner, move your starting point farther up or down to move the seam away from the corner. I'll often stick a pin in to hold the starting edge of the binding in place as I move to my machine.

Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Attach your walking foot to your sewing machine. I find using the walking foot makes attaching the binding much easier. I also use a machine quilting glove on my left hand as I sew. That gives me a lot more control over the bulk of the quilt as I'm trying to move it, especially if it's a larger quilt.

Don't start sewing right at the beginning of the binding strip. You'll want to leave a tail that is at least 6" long and I usually go more like 8". I really don't like struggling with those ends when I'm trying to join them together! In this picture, the scissors are pointing at the pin where I would start sewing. With the raw edge of the binding matching the raw edge of the quilt, start stitching the binding. Backstitch at the beginning and use a 1/4" seam.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Stop sewing 1/4" away from the corner and backstitch. Take the quilt out of the machine.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Turn the quilt so the side you just sewed is at the top and the next side is on the right. Fold the binding up away from the quilt, forming a diagonal fold. The raw edge of the binding should form a straight line with the raw edge of the quilt.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Fold the binding back down along the edge of the quilt. The fold should match the top edge of the quilt.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
This will leave a flap at the corner that we'll use to create the miter.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Start stitching right at the top edge, backstitching again and using a 1/4" seam. Repeat for the three remaining corners.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com

Join the Ends

Stop a good 10" or more from where you started stitching. Don't be tempted to make the gap smaller as the smaller the gap, the harder it is to manipulate the ends to join them together and the higher your frustration level will climb. Again, ask me how I know :)
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Take the two strips and lay them nice and flat against the quilt, folding them back on themselves where they meet. Snip about 1/8" at the folds.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Take the right hand strip and open it out flat. Turn it so it is at a right angle to the quilt, right side up, as shown.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
You can see the little snip in this picture.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Now, take the left hand strip and find the snip. Lay the left hand strip right sides together with the first strip, matching the snips. You may need to fold your quilt to make it easier to bring the strips together. Sometimes I even find I need to pin a fold into the quilt so it won't keep pulling the strips apart. Pin the strips together.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Again, you can see the snips in this picture.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Stitch a diagonal line from the top left intersection to the bottom right intersection. Again, you could mark this line if you want, but I don't bother.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Straighten out your quilt to make sure the binding lies nice and flat as you've sewn it. If there's an issue, it's better to find out now rather than after you've trimmed off the excess fabric.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
If everything looks good, then trim off the excess fabric, leaving a 1/4" seam allowance.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Press the seam allowance, then press the fold back into the binding. Stitch the gap between your starting and stopping points so that the entire binding is attached to the back of the quilt.

Trim the corners. I find this helps to make the corners of the binding look neater. Just be careful not to cut your stitching lines.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Press the binding away from the back of the quilt. This is a tip I picked up more recently (like maybe a year ago) and I'm amazed at the difference it makes. Such a small thing, but it really makes the finished binding looks more professional.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com

Stitching the Binding to the Front

Flip the quilt over and pull the binding up so that it faces the front of the quilt.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Fold the binding down over the raw edge of the quilt and pin in place. If you have Wonder Clips, this is a great time to use them. I don't have clips, but I find pins work really well and I hardly ever stab myself with them. Even when I'm handling large quilts :) It probably helps that I use pins that are a little on the smaller side. Keep the pins fairly close together so the binding lays flat between them.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
When it comes to the corner, I find it helps to pin in this order...First, I pin close to the corner on the side I've been pinning...
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
...then I turn the quilt so the next side is at the top and pin a little ways away from the corner. This helps keep the binding from trying to flip up as I'm folding the corner neatly.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
To fold the corner, start with the side that you were pinning first, then fold the second side on top of it, which will give you a nice mitered corner. Pin close to the corner on the second side. Repeat that process as you work your way around, pinning the binding around the entire quilt.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
At this point, make sure you're using thread that blends with your binding fabric on top. On the bottom, I tend to go with thread that will blend with the backing fabric.

I really struggle with getting a good picture of something under the needle in my machine, so this next picture isn't great, but hopefully you can see well enough.

I shift my needle slightly to the left for this part and try to stitch really close to the folded edge of the binding. If you look past the needle in the picture, you can just barely see that there are gaps in the metal of my walking foot. I use the inside edge of the gap on the left as my guide.

I recommend stitching slowly, taking out the pins just as they reach the front of the walking foot.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
This is what the finished binding will look like from the front.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
And this is what it looks like on the back. In hindsight, I probably should have used the Connecting Threads thread in "Honey' (affiliate link) rather than the blue as that would have blended in better with the quilting.
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
And there you have it - one perfectly bound quilt!
Bind a quilt by machine | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
I hope you found this tutorial helpful :)

I'll be linking up with NTT, Can I Get a Whoop Whoop, Finish it Up Friday and Let's Bee Social.



This post contains an affiliate link. That means that if you click on the link and then make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. It does not affect the price to pay.

May 04, 2016

Just the Basics Mystery Quilt - Flying Geese and Square-in-a-square

Welcome back for month 3 of the Just the Basics Mystery Quilt!
 Just the Basics Mystery Quilt-a-Long | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
It has been a lot of fun seeing the piles of finished HSTs made after last month's instructions were posted. Whew! 128 was a lot, but you guys rocked it :)

Introduction


Running from March to August 2016, the Just the Basics mystery quilt-a-long will require no special rulers and no scary techniques. The design is confident beginner level and there will be no paper piecing, no applique, no improv piecing and no y-seams! Not that there's anything wrong with any of those techniques, but sometimes it's fun to see what you can make out of basic blocks.

I promise, the basics are anything but boring!

It's never too late to join in. All of the posts can be found under the tab at the top of the blog, so you can start anytime. New posts will be published here on the first Wednesday of each month. You can follow Devoted Quilter by Bloglovin, email or Feedly to be sure you don't miss anything - the links are all on the sidebar. You can also sign up for my new newsletter, The Bulletin, the first issue goes out on the 16th of this month!

Remember, you can choose to make the Just the Basics mystery quilt in the 48" x 48" baby/wall size or the 60" x 72" throw size. Either way you'll cut and piece the units the same, but you'll make more of each unit for the throw quilt.

If you're on Instagram, don't forget to share your progress! Use #JustTheBasicsMysteryQuilt and tag me @devotedquilter.

In case you're just getting started, March was fabric selection and April was HSTs. Now let's get going!

This Month's Instructions


As you might have guessed from the title of this post, this month we'll be making two different units, flying geese and square-in-a-square. Again, we'll make both a little larger than needed and then trim them down so they'll be perfect.

Once again, as a reminder, here are the fabrics I've chosen for my quilt.
Just the Basics Mystery Quilt-a-Long | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com

Flying Geese



Like HSTs, flying geese appear in many quilts and quilt blocks. You can check out my Pinterest Flying Geese board to see some examples. We'll be using fabric 1 for the 'geese' and fabric 2 for the 'sky'. With my fabrics, that means the geese will be grey and the sky will be blue.

For the wall/baby size, you need 64 flying geese.
For the throw size, you need 120 flying geese.

We'll be making these using the four at a time, no-waste method and chain piecing too. Don't you love how chain piecing can speed up the process?

Cut


For baby/wall size

From fabric 1 - 16 squares 5 3/4" x 5 3/4"
From fabric 2 - 64 squares 3 1/4" x 3 1/4"


For throw size

From fabric 1 - 30 squares 5 3/4" x 5 3/4"
From fabric 2 - 120 squares 3 1/4" x 3 1/4"


On the backs of all of your fabric 2 squares, draw a diagonal line from corner to corner.

Right sides together, position 2 fabric 2 squares in opposite corners of a fabric 1 square as shown. The fabric 2 squares will overlap in the middle and the drawn lines should form one continuous line. Pin. Do this with all of your fabric 1 squares so that the whole pile is ready for chain piecing.
Flying geese tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Stitch 1/4" away from the line on both sides. Don't break your thread between squares, just keep feeding them into your machine with only a couple of stitches between them to create a long chain of squares. Chain piecing in this way is much faster and reduces thread waste. When all the squares are sewn, cut the threads joining them.
Flying geese tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
 Cut apart on the drawn line.
 Flying geese tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
 Press the fabric 2 triangles open.
Flying geese tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Right sides together, position another fabric 2 square in the corner of the fabric 1 triangle as shown. Be careful that the drawn line is positioned as shown. Pin. Again, do this for all your units at once.
Flying geese tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
 Stitch 1/4" from the line on both sides.
Flying geese tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Cut apart on the drawn line and press the fabric 2 triangle open.  You now have what is likely a somewhat imperfect flying geese block, as these blocks are also notorious for being hard to piece perfectly.
Flying geese tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
A little trimming will fix that right up and you'll have a perfect 4 1/2" x 2 1/2" block.

You will notice in these pictures that I used two different rulers. That's because one of my rulers is really long and somewhat unwieldy and my smaller one doesn't have a 45° line on it. You can certainly do all of this trimming with one ruler.

With the flying geese block on your cutting mat, position your ruler so that the 45° line is exactly on top of the diagonal seam in your block and the 1/4" mark is exactly touching the tip of the triangle. Trim across the top of the unit.
Flying geese tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Now align the top of your ruler with the top of your block. Position the 2 1/4" mark at the point of the triangle and trim the right hand side of the block.
Flying geese tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
It seems I forgot to take a picture of the next step (sorry!). Turn the block so that the top of the block is now at the bottom and align the bottom of the ruler with the bottom of the block. Position the 2 1/4" mark at the point of the triangle and trim the side.

All that's left now is to trim the excess off the bottom of the blocks, and that can be done in batches. Align a couple of blocks so that their tops are even. Trim the blocks to 2 1/2" wide.
Flying geese tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
And there you have it - perfect flying geese!
Flying geese tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com


Square-in-a-Square


Square-in-a-square blocks, and their siblings the economy blocks, are not quite as famous as HSTs and flying geese, but they still pop up in plenty of quilt designs. Unfortunately, they are also hard to piece perfectly (are you sensing a theme here?), but making them a little larger than needed and then trimming eliminates all the hassle of trying to sew together imperfect blocks. We'll be using fabrics 3 and 4 for our square-in-a-square blocks, and in my fabrics that means the orange and black fabrics.

For the baby/wall size, you need 16 square-in-a-square blocks.
For the throw size, you need 30 square-in-a-square blocks.

Cut


For baby/wall size 

From fabric 3 - 32 squares 3 1/2" x 3 1/2", cut once diagonally to yield 64 triangles
From fabric 4 - 16 squares 3 3/8" x 3 3/8"

For throw size

From fabric 3 - 60 squares 3 1/2" x 3 1/2", cut once diagonally to yield 120 triangles.
From fabric 4 - 30 squares 3 3/8" x 3 3/8"


Fold a fabric 4 square in half and crease lightly. Fold one fabric 3 triangle in half along the long side and crease lightly. Place the triangle right sides together with the square, matching the creases at the top edge and matching the point of the triangle with the crease on the square. The ensures that the triangle is perfectly centered and straight. As you can see in the picture, the points of the triangle will extend past the edges of the square. Do this with all of your fabric 4 squares, then chain piece all of them at once.
Square-in-a-square tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Press the triangle open and repeat with another fabric 3 triangle on the opposite side of the square. Press the second triangle open.
Square-in-a-square tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Fold the square in half in the opposite direction and crease lightly. In the same manner as before, add triangles to the two remaining sides of all of your fabric 4 squares.
Square-in-a-square tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Now you have (once again) slightly imperfect blocks ready for trimming. We will be trimming these to 4 1/2" squares.
Square-in-a-square tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Line up your block on your cutting mat so that the top and bottom points of the center square are exactly on a line. I used my small ruler to check that the points were lined up.
Square-in-a-square tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
 Now measure 2 1/4" from the center points and trim the side.
Square-in-a-square tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
 As you can see, 2 1/4" from the center points leaves me exactly 1/4" from the side point.
Square-in-a-square tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
Trim all four sides the same way. If you have a rotating mat (or one that's small enough that you can turn it and still reach your block easily), then you can line up the center points, trim the first side and then turn the whole mat to trim the second side. Then turn the block, line up the center points and trim the remaining two sides. Otherwise, just turn your block and line up the center points before trimming each side.

And now you have perfect 4 1/2" square-in-a-square blocks!
Square-in-a-square tutorial | DevotedQuilter.blogspot.com
That's it for this month! I can't wait to see your progress! Don't forget to tag me (@devotedquilter) and use #JustTheBasicsMysteryQuilt if you're on Instagram. You can also leave me a link to a blog post in the comments or email me a picture (devotedquilter at gmail dot com).

I'll be back with the next step in June!

One more thing...Did you see my giveaway in this post? I'll be picking a winner tomorrow (Thursday ) night, so there's still time to enter :)
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